July 27, 2005

Doreen Smith reports: “Here follows a list of “special” plants now flowering in the Abbotts Lagoon area – both adjacent to and off the main trail. Many would be difficult to find without guidance from someone who has spent at lot of time searching out there. In all I found 115 flowering species.
Cirsium andrewsii, Franciscan thistle
Campanula californica, marsh harebell
Stellaria littoralis, marsh stitchwort
Monardella undulata, dune coyote-mint
Alpecurus aequalis var. sonomensis, Sonoma short-awn foxtail
Chorizanthe spp., Spineflowers
Leptosiphon rosaceus, rosy linanthus.


Linanthus grandiflorus
photo by John Conley

July 4, 2005

John Conley reports “Linanthus grandiflorus is currently blooming profusely along Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, near the “F Ranch”, on the Point Reyes Peninsula.&quot




Clarkia amoena ssp.amoenaphoto by Doreen L. SmithClarkia amoena ssp.amoenaphoto by Doreen L. Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 23, 2005

Doreen Smith reports: “The roadside bank S. of the bridge where highway 1 crosses Stemple Creek north of Tomales is one mass of Clarkia amoena ssp.amoena “




Antirrhinum vexillo-calyculatum
photo by Peter Denisevich

June 21, 2005

Peter Denisevich reports: “Antirrhinum vexillo-calyculatum (Snapdragon) in Cascade Canyon MCOSD, Fairfax, near start of trail along north side of creek. Also at Phoenix Lake on road across dam.
…local fauna — Battus philenor (Pipevine Swallowtail) caterpillar on Aristolochia californica [and poison oak!], also in Cascade Canyon.”


June 13, 2005

Doreen Smith reports: “Gentiana affinis var. ovata in grassland and scrub on the bluffs above and to the west of Drakes Beach, Pt. Reyes National Seashore.



Silene californica
photo by Ted Kipping

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 13, 2005

Ted Kipping: reports “Silene californica (Indian Pink) on embankment on road between Stinson Beach and Pan Toll Camp through Steep Ravine. The soil is a serpentine marl. The grasses are mostly festuca californica —a lovely glade just above the road. Indian pink is visible mid-June through August.”


June 3, 2005

Joe Kohn reports: Silene californica in bloom on the top of Ring Mountain in Tiburon.


May 24, 2005

Bob Soost reports: “There is an unusual display of Mule Ears, Wyethia angustifolia, in view from Nicasio Valley Rd. on the W side of the road at the S end (nearest Nicasio) of Nicasio reservoir. It is best seen from the wide, dirt turnoff (N of the row of trees that borders the road) on the W side of the road. There are hundreds of plants in bloom on the grassy slope and drainage area. “




April 29, 2005

Sharon Salisbury reports: “The Mira Flores Open Space in Tiburon is bursting with flowers. Both in numbers and variety, I have never seen this place so extravagemt. You can’t set your foot anywhere without stepping on a flower, even in the middle of the trails. To name a few…Triteleia laxa, Achillea millefolium, Lasthenia californica, Layia platyglossa (yellow seas), Poppies, Sisyrinchium californicum, Allium lacunosum (white pools of them, especially off the Gilmartin exit as you cut across to the cliffs) Cryptantha flaccida, Wyethia angustifolia, Lupines, Dudleya farinosa, Thermopsis californica, Trifolium fucatum, Climbing Morning Glory, Platystemon californicus, Sidalcea malviflora, Viola pedunculata, Castillega densiflora, Soap Plant, Ranunculus californicus, Vicia americana, Trifolium bifidum and these are just the ones I saw in 45 minutes. “




April 13, 2005

Calen Hall reports: “In the wet meadow on the road into the lake Lagunitas parking lot: Calochortus uniflorus – many, many more than last year Lasthenia californica, Lotus formosissimus, Iris macrosiphon – very fragrant, blue-eyed grass. Also of note are the masses of Lupinus nanus blooming on the same road about .25 mile back toward Bon Tempe lake. Mixed with poppies they remind me of the bloom down south.”




Streptanthus glandulosus ssp. secundus	
photo by Peter Denisevich

April 12, 2005

Peter Denisevich reports sighting of Streptanthus glandulosus ssp. secundus (One-sided Jewelflower) in bloom. ” In Fairfax, on the trail going east from Deer Park School, just below the junction with Worn Spring Road. Also on the rock outcrops along the lower part of the same trail.”




Aquilegia formosa	
photo by Brenda Lein

April 5, 2005

Brenda Lein reports: Red Columbine (Aquilegia formosa) in bloom. “This is the first I’ve seen this year. It’s in Deer Park. It’s on the right hand side of the trail between Oak Junction and Six Points (taking a left off the Fire Road to head up to Six Points from Deer Park.) There will be a few more along this trail as the days progress, but I think never as many as what we’ll see in Elliot Nature Preserve.”




April 5, 2005

Sharon Salisbury reports: “Discovered a wonderful wildflower trail in Novato called Blackstone Canyon. The path lead through a steep-sided verdant green valley and is followed the entire way by a tumbling, tuneful creek with sounds of frogs in the quieter places. There is a Woodwardia fimbriata on the left just a short way into the hike. It is at least 8’x8′. Never seen one so large. The first part of the trail is covered with Blue Dicks, and the most buttercups I have ever seen in one place. There are also many iris, both dark blue, pale mauve and hundreds of pale yellow ones, especially on the hills on the far side of the creek. Quite a few Woodland Stars, Intermediate Fiddlenecks at least two varieties of Lupines and a few California poppies. One very tiny species of lupine nestled in with Fewflower Clover…Also lots of Sweet Cicely and Snake Root. If you continue up the rather rough and step trail with the creek now on your left and cascading down in many small waterfalls, look to your right and you will see a large field of Chinese Houses and Blue Dicks. Quite a sight. I have never seen so many Chinese Houses in one place. The next lovely surprise was several scarlet Larkspur reaching out to touch me as I passed by. Many birds and butterflies, especially Painted Ladies.”


Delphinium nudicaule	
photo by Brenda Lein

April 3, 2005

Brenda Lein reports: “Carson Falls are just surrounded by the Red Larkspur. Even more spectacular then what we saw at Deer Park.”


April 2, 2005

Brenda Lein reports: “Above Deer Park, in Fairfax, on the Yolanda trail between Six Points and the fire road, on the ridge trail where it overlooks Deer Park field, Red Larkspur were growing amidst moss covered rocks. Quite a spectacular display of them!”


March 20, 2005

Calen Hall reports: “Calochortus umbellatus is blooming on the summit of Loma Alta above the cattle-proof gate facing Lucas Valley. I was delighted to run into it. Along the track to the summit from the Sleepy Hollow-Terra Linda ridge there are diminutive Collinsia and quite a few of a Delphinium. On the grassy hogbacks approaching White’s Hill from the north Nemophila menziesii, Platystemon californicus, Dichelostemma sp, Ranunculus californicus, man root, and a few I don’t know are abundant among the bunch grasses. Not many on the south-facing aspects, though.”


Calochortus umbellatus	
photo by Peter Denisevich

March 16, 2005

Peter Denisevich reports Calochortus umbellatus “in serpentinite soil on Pam’s Blue Ridge above Fairfax. I only saw two in bloom and one was pretty tattered.”




March 14, 2005

Sharon Salisbury reports: “The Calochortus umbellatus are blooming again on the Homestead Valley trail. I was up there yesterday and there must have been a hundred plus on the hill to the right of the trail. I turned left at the top and there were many more on both sides of the trail. Also Camissonia ovata, Smilacina stellata, Dichelostemma capitatum, Marah fabaceus and Fragaria vesca.”




Corallorhiza striata	
photo by Brenda Lein

March 8, 2005

Brenda Lein reports: Corallorhiza striata (Striped Coralroot) in bloom at “Deer Park – on Yolanda trail, midpoint between Six Points and the fire road/Worn Spring Road.”


Fritillaria liliacea
photo by M A Stevens

February 27, 2005

Mary Stevens reports: “Fritillaria liliacea is blooming by the side of Nicasio Valley Road, south of the intersection with the Petaluma-Pt. Reyes Road.


February 26, 2005

Sharon Salisbury reports: “on the Escalon Fire Trail I saw at least 50 Dodecatheon hendersonii on the bank and although not rare, I have been walking this trail for years and never seen them in this place nor so many. “


February 22, 2005

Don Henry reports: “There were today at least ten or twelve Calypso orchids in blossom above the trail east of the Rock Spring parking area; and ~80-90 Dodecatheon hendersonii along the nearby Simmons Trail, just beyond the point where the Benstein Trail forks off to the right.”


Fritillaria affinis var. tristulis
photo by John Conley

February 16, 2005

John Conley reports:”Our early (and wet) Spring is continuing to produce wildflower blooms in small but ever-increasing numbers, several weeks before one would normally expect to see them in those numbers. On February 12th, numerous wildflowers were in bloom at Chimney Rock and on the bluffs near the Point Reyes lighthouse. Baby Blue Eyes (Nemophila menziesii) are currently abundant near the lighthouse parking area. The Point Reyes Checker (or Chocolate) Lily (Fritillaria affinis var. tristulis) is blooming nearby, as are the first flowers of the Coast Rock Cress (Arabis blepharophylla). Douglas Iris (Iris douglasiana) are beginning to bloom at Chimney Rock, as are Checkerbloom (Sidalcea malviflora), Coast Fiddleneck (Amsinckia spectabilis), Field Chickweed (Cerastium arvense) and at least one species of Paintbrush (Castilleja sp.). Near the Chimney Rock parking area, Goldfields (Lasthenia californica) and “Johnny-Tuck” (Triphysaria eriantha var. rosea) are just beginning to bloom.”


Mimulus douglasii
photo by Doreen Smith

February 12, 2005

Doreen Smith reports: “many plants of the little mouse-ears monkeyflower, Mimulus douglasii,&quot on the s.slope of Mt. Burdell. From San Carlos Drive hike west then north to the watertank area of serpentine. The plants are near the watertank, on the s. facing serpentine slope.


February 10, 2005

Sharon Salisbury reports: “last week I found some Fetid Adder’s Tongues still blooming at Cascade Waterfall and yesterday on Homestead trail there were Milkmaids, Indian Warriors (Pedicularis densiflora), Hound’s Tongue (Cynoglossum grande), Fetid Adder’s Tongue (Scoliopus bigelovii), Trilliums (ovatum) and Mission Bells (Fritillaria lanceolata).”


Ranunculus lobbii
photo by Doreen Smith

February 2, 2005

Doreen Smith reports: “Ranunculus lobbii are now flowering (super-early) in a vernal pool near the Hicks Valley school. It is a rare, small white-flowered buttercup that
grows in vernal pools that dry up completely by summer. It is similar to a later-blooming species, Ranunculus aquatilis, but differs in petal shape and floating-leaf shape.


Erigeron glaucus
photo by John Conley

January 15, 2005

John Conley reports: “It seems that we are having an early Spring. Erigeron glaucus (Seaside Daisy) has been in bloom at Chimney Rock since (before) Christmas, and the blooms are now increasing by the day. Erysimum menziesii (“wallflower”) is also in bloom at Chimney Rock. “Footsteps of Spring” (Sanicula arctopoides) is beginning to bloom at Chimney Rock. “


Blennosperma nanum robustum

 

 

 

 

January 12, 2005

Doreen Smith reports: ” More flowers are up! Particularly the little blennosperma (Blennosperma nanum var, nanum) of Mt. Burdell’s S. slopes- west of and near San Carlos Drive open space entrance.”


January 6, 2005

Doreen Smith reports: ” The Dodecatheon hendersonii is in flower at the foot of Big Rock Ridge-i.e. back of my house in the “Open Space.” It is very early for them to bloom.”


Trillium chloropetalum
photo by John Conley

January 1, 2005

John Conley reports: “Trillium chloropetalum (aka Giant Wake Robin, Sessile Trillium, Giant Trillium) is in bloom at the lower end of the Steep Ravine Trail (just a few feet from Highway 1) today, January 1, 2005. These trilliums bloom early, in this particular location, but this is the earliest that I’ve ever seen a bloom from them (in some ten years or so of observation). I suppose that our warmer-than-usual Winter (so far) is the cause of these early blooms? I also saw California Milkmaids (Cardamine californica) in bloom today — on the Dipsea Trail, just before it enters Steep Ravine. They are ready to bloom elsewhere, particularly near the T. chloropetalum blooming near the terminus of the Steep Ravine Trail. “


Arctostaphylos_manzanita var. manzanita
photo by Doreen Smith

December 15, 2004

Doreen Smith reports: “I drove through China Camp State Park yesterday and many shrubs of the “common manzanita” Arctostaphylos manzanita are already in full flower. This variety of the species has its southern limit in Marin. The early rains must have had a good effect on the plants. There was also the occasional milkmaids, Cardamine californica. Of course one can always find at least 1 plant of California poppy any time of the year – there is one with two open flowers at the east end of Lucas Valley road.
“I had it reported to me by Joe Kohn that near Abbotts Lagoon the Marin County Open Space naturalist’s group found Sisyrinchium bellum and Ranunculus californicus in flower.”




Nuphar lutea spp. polysepalumphoto by MAStevensNuphar lutea spp. polysepalumphoto by John Wall

 

 

 

 

 

May 26, 2004

John Wall reports: “The yellow pond-lilies Nuphar lutea spp. polysepalum at Lily Pond near Alpine Lake are still blooming, but many are going to seed and make interesting looking fruits. On the north edge of the Lily Pond area at the base of the small talus slope there are still some Red Larkspur (Delphinium nudicaule) in bloom, and the Red Ribbons (Clarkia concinna) seem to just be getting started. “




Pyrola picta f. aphylla
photo by MAStevens

May 5, 2004

Mary Stevens reports: ” Pyrola picta f. aphylla is now in bloom along the upper side of the Matt Davis Trail, west of Pantoll.


Clintonia andrewsianaphoto by MAStevensCollinsia heterophyllaphoto by MAStevens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 19, 2004

Julieann Johnson and Mary Stevens report: 87 Clintonia andrewsiana budding on the Steep Ravine Trail, mostly above the ladder. The lower half of the trail has many Actaea rubra, Baneberry, in flower and berry. On the Matt Davis trail west of Pantoll, there were still a few Calypso bulbosa blooming. Many Pyrola picta var. aphylla, Leafless Wintergreen, are budding, abundant Corallorhiza maculata var. maculata, Spotted Coralroot, are blooming. Also to be found along the upper part of the Matt Davis trail are Collinsia heterophylla, Chinese Houses, Delphinium nudicaule, Red Larkspur, Iris douglasiana, Douglas Iris, Madia (Anisocarpus) madioides, Woodland Madia, Eriophyllum lanatum var. arachnoideum, Woolly Sunflower, and Trientalis latifolia, Star-flower. “


 

April 12, 2004

John Wall reports: “The yellow pond-lilies Nuphar lutea spp. polysepalum at Lily Pond near Alpine Lake are just opening up. Maybe by next week the blossoms will be fully open, but it wouldn’t surprise me if they still are not. They seem to open very slowly! “


March 15, 2004

Sharon Salisbury reports: “The Miraflores Open Space in Tiburon… is definitely awakening. Lomatium dasycarpum, Phacelia californica, Ranunculus californicus, Thermopsis californica, Dichelostemma capitatum, Lasthenia californica and Achillea millefolium were all in bloom and I didn’t even make it to the cliffs.”


March 15, 2004

Joe Kohn reports: “I spotted what must have been more than 100 Calypso Orchids, which looked like they’d all just started to bloom. It was all within a 5 minute walk of the Rock Springs Parking Lot at Mt Tam. Directly behind the parking lot, if you go towards the right towards the Mtn Theater, there’s a stand of Doug Fir, with the orchids underneath. Also, if you walk on Cataract Trail towards Laurel Dell, within a few minutes you’ll enter a wooded area with Doug Fir, and if you look just right, you’ll see 100 Calypso Orchids, or more.”


March 15, 2004

Jim Gratiot reports: “Encourage people to join Wilma on Mt. Burdell this Wednesday or to come themselves this weekend. Everything is in bloom including some Linanthus, Lupinus bicolor, Platystemon, Triphysaria, Castilleja densiflora?, Layia chrysanthemoides, and even some Lewisia rediviva as well as many others.


March 5, 2004

Sharon Salisbury reports: “Nothing rare but just wanted to note that I went back up the Homestead trail today and there are hundreds of FAT’s that have bloomed out. So the population is still there. I was too early and then too late.Today there were dozens of Trillium ovatum, Cynoglossum grande and Smilicina sessilifolia just coming into bloom. Further up in the sun were Camissonia ovata and Pedicularis densiflora.”


February 27, 2004

Sharon Salisbury reports: “Went to the Headlands to watch the roiling ocean and monster waves and stopped to look at wildflowers in between squalls. Blooming were: Cardamine californica Milk Maids Castilleja subinclusa ssp. franciscana Franciscan Paintbrush, Gnaphalium californicum California Everlasting, Heracleum lanatum Cow Parsnip, Marah fabaceus Manroot, Phacelia californica California Perennial Phacelia, Ranunculus californicus California Buttercup, and Sanicula arctopoides Footsteps-of-Spring,


Mahonia pinnata
photo by John Conley

February 7, 2004

John Conley reports “Mahonia pinnata (California Mahonia aka California Barberry) is now in bloom at Point Reyes, on the rocky outcroppings near the Lighthouse. Erysimum menziesii (Point Reyes Wallflower) is now blooming at Chimney Rock.”




Scoliopus bigelovii
photo by Mary Aline Stevens

February 4, 2004

Mary Stevens reports: “Hundreds of Scoliopus bigelovii (fetid adder’s tongue) are blooming along the lower end of Cataract Trail as it passes by the banks of Alpine Lake. They should also be blooming on Cataract Trail as it comes into the lower end of Laurell Dell as well as near the bridge to the Fire Road which comes down from Ridgecrest Boulevard.”


January 30, 2004

Jim Gratiot reports from Mt. Burdell: “The Simmons Lane enclosure has a few blooming Fritillaria liliacea. Burdell is also sporting fields of Zigadenus fremontii, Blennosperma nanum, and Ranunculus californicus. Cynoglossum grande is just beginning on the western hillside above San Andreas road. Fritillaria affinis is in bud but not blooming yet as is Dodecatheon hendersonii”



January 13, 2004

Don Henry reports: “Scoliopus bigelovii (fetid adder’s tongue) is just beginning to bloom at Cascade Falls in Mill Valley. From downtown Mill Valley, take Throckmorton past the public library all the way to the end where it intersects Cascade. Turn right onto Cascade and watch for a small parking lot on the right with a wooden sign reading CASCADE FALLS.”


Arctostaphylos manzanita thumb 2Blennosperma nanum robustum

 

 

 

 

January 12, 2004

Doreen Smith reports on Arctostaphylos manzanita var. manzanita (common manzanita) “This attractive shrub or small tree is fairly common about oak woodlands in the north half of Marin County. In fact this is the southern limit of this variety of the species. Usually the flowers first appear in late December or early January. They are visited by Anna’s hummingbirds for the nectar at the base of the corolla. Most plants have pearly-white flowers but a few have rosy pink petals and deep pink calyces. A good example of the pink form can be seen on the road to Bahia, east Novato, halfway down the hill with terraces cut for prospective home sites.
“The small, yellow composite,Blennosperma nanum var. nanum, grows on serpentine sites in several parts of the county, being replaced by the later-blooming var. robustum on Pt. Reyes National Seashore. The plants pictured here are from Mt. Burdell, Novato. Other populations are at the crest of Lucas Valley Road opposite the Big Rock and for some distance to the west, on the serpentine there. Also plants can be found near Nicasio reservoir on the hills and flats. There are also some in the Chileno Valley area; some at the roadside, others on the hills in the area. In other counties the plant is characteristic of seasonal wetlands and vernal pools, for example at the Jepson Prairie Preserve in Solano county.”




January 12, 2004

Mary Stevens reports: Scoliopus bigelovii (fetid adder’s tongue) is in full bloom in Muir Woods. The largest cluster of about 50 blooms is by the right side of the main trail between signpost 3 and bridge 3. Just to the right inside the entrance to Muir Woods you can see both male catkins and the tiny red female flowers (at the tips of the branches) of Corylus cornuta var. californica (hazelnut).




Cardamine californica var. californica
photo by John Conley

January 10, 2004

John Conley reports: “Cardamine californica (Milkmaids) is blooming (in small numbers) at the lower end of the Steep Ravine trail (near Hwy. 1) on Mount Tamalpais. I also noticed that “sessile” trillium (Trilium chloropetalum) is emerging from the ground, but is not yet in bloom at the same location.”


Asclepias fascicularisphoto by John WallPerideridia kelloggiiphoto by John Wall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 10, 2003

John Wall reports: Asclepias fascicularis, Narrow-leaved Milkweed, in still in bloom. “Park at the big Mountain Theater dirt lot just up from Rock Spring. Walk up the Rock Springs-Lagunitas fire road. Pass the coulter pines and the shaded section until you reach the large meadow on the east side of the road. Head up that steep section (still on the road) and keep your eyes peeled down the slope to the west (left)…It was in a small ravine behind some young doug firs (before the top). In this area you will also see blooming Calycadenia multiglandulosa White Rosinweed and Perideridia kelloggii Kellogg’s Yampah.”




August 17, 2003

Bob Sills and Norbert Jeske report: Seven plants of Goodyera oblongifolia Rattlesnake Plantain in bloom as well as a number of plants of Clintonia andrewsiana with cobalt blue berries can be found at the intersection of Ridgecrest Blvd and the Bolinas-Fairfax Road.
They also report: Aquilegia eximia Serpentine Seep Columbine is blooming by the side of the road at milepost 5.23 (between Azalea Hill and Alpine Dam) on the Bolinas-Fairfax Road.



Gentiana affinis var. ovata
photo by M A Stevens

August 15, 2003

Doreen Smith reports: Here is the plant list of native Californians in flower at the Peter Behr overlook trail at Drakes Beach, Pt. Reyes.
Achillea millefolium yarrow
Anaphalis margaritacea pearly everlasting
Angelica hendersonii coastal angelica
Aster chilensis coastal aster
Baccharis pilularis coyote bush
Calamagrostis nutkaensis Nootka reedgrass
Calystegia purpurata morning-glory
Eriogonum latifolium coastal buckwheat
Gentiana affinis blue gentian
Grindelia stricta gumplant
Heracleum lanatum cow-parsnip
Horkelia californica Ca. horkelia
Perideridia kelloggii Kellogg’s yampah
Prunella vulgaris selfheal
Solidago spathulata spoonleaf goldenrod
Spiranthes romanzoffiana hooded ladies tresses
Stachys ajugoides var. rigida hedgenettle


July 27, 2003

Brad Kelley further reports: “If this year is anything like last, Piperia elegans should begin blooming about now in Mill Valley, Goodyera oblongifolia should be sending up spikes to bloom on Mt. Tam in late August. Another orchid native to Marin is the rare Piperia elegans ssp. decurtata, Marin Coastal Rein Orchid, which grows near the Pt. Reyes lighthouse.


Piperia michaelii
photo by Brad Kelley

July 25, 2003

Not seen in Marin for over 50 years, a small number of plants of Piperia michaelii, Michael’s Rein Orchid, were found blooming at Pt. Reyes by Doreen Smith and Bob Soost’s rare plant monitoring group.


July 17, 2003

Brad Kelley reports: Platanthera leucostachys, Bog Rein-orchis, blooming at Bull Point, Pt. Reyes Piperia transversa, Transverse-spur Rein Orchid, and Piperia elongata, Long-spurred Rein Orchid, blooming at Roy’s Redwoods


July 4, 2003

Doreen Smith reports: “I thought you might like to know what’s flowering now on the Bull Point area, we went there Friday 4th July. This might encourage people to support Bob’s field trip on July 12th.
“The Linanthus grandiflorus is very abundant, there are huge patches. Also the Linanthus parviflorus var. rosaceus. The Lilium maritimum is just starting to flower. Other interesting spp. present are Tofieldia occidentalis, Triteleia peduncularis, Prunella vulgaris, Campanula californica, Sidalcea calycosa ssp. rhizomata, Juncus phaeocephalus, Cordylanthus maritimus var. palustris, Triglochin striata, Ledum glandulosum, Lupinus variicolor, Lupinus arboreus (yellow) Castilleja ambigua, Monardella undulata, Deschampsia caespitosa var. holciformis and Horkelia marinensis. Many of these are Pt. Reyes rare plants.
“We also found on our Friday trip an unusually robust form of Trifolium obtusiflorum, Polygonum marinense and Astragalus pycnostachyus.var. pycnostachyus and of course Grindelia stricta of the saltmarshes.. These were near the Drake’s Estero bridge. Brad Kelley got some excellent pix. of Chorizanthe valida from the Lunny population.”


Dudleya farinosa
photo by Sharon Salisbury

June 23, 2003

Sharon Salisbury reports: “Still blooming at Miraflores Open Space in Tiburon are Dudleya farinosa on the rocks on the cliff’s edge, The Clarkia and Calochortus are quite spectacular against the dried, tan grasses.&quot
Also still blooing:
Calochortus luteus Yellow Mariposa
Castilleja rubicundula Creamsacs
Clarkia rubicunda Ruby Chalice Godetia
Eriogonum nudum Nude Buckwheat
Eriophyllum confertiflorum Golden Yarrow
Grindelia hirsutula Gumplant
Hemizonia congesta Tarplant
Layia platyglossa Tidytips
Lupinus microcarpus Secund Lupine
Monardella purpurea Serpentine Monardella
Triteleia laxa Ithuriel’s Spear
Wyethia angustifolia Narrow-leaf Mule-ears


June 22, 2003

Doreen Smith reports:
“This last weekend I “did” Old St. Hilary’s Open Space (Tiburon) where the Helenium is blooming gold in the seeps below the church Also there, in bloom, are Lilium pardalinum, Stachys pycnantha, Triteleia peduncularis and assorted Cyperaceae. On the access, via Vistazo West fire road, are Streptanthus niger, Verbena lasiostachys, Eriogonum luteolum var. caninum and Clarkia rubicunda.
“I also took in Lagunitas Meadows where there are many deep blue Navarretia viscidula, some Brodiaea terrestris, Brodiaea elegans and a few Castilleja ambigua, the only population I know of that isn’t on Pt. Reyes. If you know where to look there are Sidalcea calycosa ssp. calycosa. The tall bunch grass is Deschampsia cespitosa.”


June 18, 2003

Mary Stevens reports:
in flower now on the Coastal Trail, Marin Headlands near intersection of Conzelman Rd and McCullough Rd.
Achillea millefolium Yarrow
Allium dichlamydeum Coast Onion
Anaphalis margaritacea Pearly Everlasting
Angelica hendersonii Coastal Angelica
Castilleja subinclusa ssp. franciscana Franciscan Paintbrush
Dudleya farinosa Sea Lettuce
Eriogonum nudum var. nudum Nude Buckwheat
Eriophyllum staechadifolium Lizard-tail
Eschscholzia californica California Poppy
Heuchera micrantha Alum-root
Hieracium albiflorum White Hawkweed
Holodiscus discolor Ocean-spray
Mimulus aurantiacus Sticky Bush Monkeyflower
Scrophularia californica ssp. californica Bee-plant
Sedum spathulifolium Spoon-leavedStone-crop
Stachys ajugoides v. rigida Hedgenettle
Triteleia laxa Ithuriel’s Spear


Calochortus tiburonensis
photo by Mary A Stevens

June 12, 2003

Mary Stevens reports:
in flower now on Ring Mountain, Tiburon
Achillea millefolium Yarrow
Allium lacunosum Pitted Onion
Brodiaea elegans Harvest Brodiaea
Calochortus tiburonensis Tiburon Mariposa Lily
Clarkia rubicunda Ruby Chalice Godetia
Delphinium hesperium Western Larkspur
Dudleya farinosa Sea Lettuce
Hemizonia congesta Tarplant
Hesperolinon congestum Marin Dwarf Flax
Lupinus microcarpus Secund Lupine
Sisyrinchium bellum Blue-eyed Grass
Thermopsis macrophylla False Lupine, Golden Pea
Triteleia hyacinthina White Brodiaea
Triteleia laxa Ithuriel’s Spear


June 11, 2003

Doreen Smith reports:
“On Mt. Burdell, lower slopes, there are still a lot of native bulbs flowering- Calochortus luteus, Triteleia laxa, Triteleia hyacinthina and Brodiaea elegans. In the marsh N. of San Andreas Drive are Triteleia peduncularis and Stachys ajugioides ssp. ajugioides. There is the native Centaurium muehlenbergii, pink with a pronounced white center to the flower, along the trail from the Wildlife Preserve to the flat area N. of San Andreas. Most of the smaller-flowered Centaurium (very abundant and in many places) is the introduced “weed” C. tenuifolium. The serpentine west of San Carlos Open Space entrance has pink masses of Eriogonum luteolum framing the serpentine balds to the S. of the fire road. Hemizonia congesta is the yellow tarplant. Clarkia concinna ssp. concinna is still doing famously along Lucas Valley Rd.


June 1, 2003

John Wall reports:
between Rock Spring and Rifle Camp
Allium unifolium Pink Onion
Calochortus luteus Yellow Mariposa
Calochortus umbellatus Oakland Star-tulip
Calochortus uniflorus Marsh Star-tulip
Castilleja densiflora Common Owl’s Clover
Cirsium brevistylum Indian Thistle
Clarkia gracilis Serpentine Godetia
Corallorhiza maculata Spotted Coralroot
Eriodictyon californicum Yerba Santa
Lotus formosissimus Coast Lotus (Witches’ Teeth)
Polygala californica Milkwort
Rhododendron occidentale Western Azalea
Sisyrinchium bellum Blue-eyed Grass
Streptanthus glandulosus ssp. pulchellus Mt.Tamalpais Jewelflower


June 6, 2003

Mary Stevens reports:
in flower along the Coastal Trail, Marin Headlands near intersection of Conzelman Rd and McCullough Rd.
Achillea millefolium Yarrow
Allium dichlamydeum Coast Onion
Anaphalis margaritacea Pearly Everlasting
Angelica hendersonii Coastal Angelica
Aquilegia formosa Red Columbine
Castilleja subinclusa ssp. franciscana Franciscan Paintbrush
Dudleya farinosa Sea Lettuce
Eriogonum nudum var. nudum Nude Buckwheat
Eriophyllum staechadifolium Lizard-tail
Eschscholzia californica California Poppy
Heuchera micrantha Alum-root
Hieracium albiflorum White Hawkweed
Holodiscus discolor Ocean-spray
Mimulus aurantiacus Sticky Bush Monkeyflower
Phacelia californica California Perennial Phacelia
Potentilla glandulosa ssp. glandulosa Sticky Cinquefoil
Scrophularia californica ssp. californica Bee-plant
Sedum spathulifolium Spoon-leavedStone-crop
Sisyrinchium bellum Blue-eyed Grass
Stachys ajugoides v. rigida Hedgenettle
Triteleia laxa Ithuriel’s Spear


Clintonia andrewsiana
photo by Mary A Stevens

May 7, 2003

Mary Stevens reports:
in flower along on the Steep Ravine Trail, Mount Tamalpais
Actaea rubra Baneberry
Aralia californica Elk Clover
Cardamine californica var. californica Woodland Milk-maids
Clintonia andrewsiana Clintonia
Corallorhiza maculata var. maculata Spotted Coralroot
Disporum hookeri Green Fairy Bells
Disporum smithii White Fairy Bells
Fritillaria affinis var. affinis Mission Bells
Iris douglasiana Douglas Iris
Osmorhiza chilensis Sweet Cicely
Smilacina racemosa Fat Solomon
Smilacina stellata Slim Solomon
Trientalis latifolia Star-flower
Whipplea modesta Modesty


May 5, 2003

Mary Stevens reports:
in flower now at Muir Woods National Monument
Aralia californica Elk Clover
Cardamine californica var. californica Woodland Milk-maids
Claytonia perfoliata Miners Lettuce
Clintonia andrewsiana Clintonia
Disporum smithii White Fairy Bells
Heracleum lanatum Cow Parsnip
Hierochloe occidentalis Vanilla Grass
Marah fabaceus Manroot
Marah oregonus Oregon manroot
Osmorhiza chilensis Sweet Cicely
Oxalis oregana Redwood Sorrel
Rubus parviflorus Thimbleberry
Tellima grandiflora Fringe-cups
Viola sempervirens Redwood Violet
Whipplea modesta Modesty



Corallorhiza maculata
photo by Mary A Stevens

April 28, 2003

Mary Stevens reports:
Matt Davis Trail west from Pantoll
Calypso bulbosa Calypso Orchid
Clarkia gracilis ssp. gracilis Serpentine Godetia
Corallorhiza maculata var. maculata Spotted Coralroot
Corallorhiza striata Striped Coralroot
Delphinium nudicaule Red Larkspur
Eriophyllum lanatum var. arachnoideum Woolly Sunflower
Iris douglasiana Douglas Iris
Sanicula crassicaulis Pacific Sanicle
Sanicula laciniata Laceleaf Sanicle


Astragalus breweri
photo by Doreen L. Smith

April 20, 2003

Doreen Smith reports: “The Rock Spring meadows are very colorful right now with
Lupinus bicolor Miniature Lupine
Lupinus nanus Sky Lupine
Trifolium spp. Clover
Phacelia divaricata Serpentine Annual Phacelia
Linanthus parviflorus Small-flowered Linanthus
Gilia clivorum Small-flowered Gilia
Collinsia sparsiflora var. collina Small-flowered Collinsia
and Astragalus breweri Brewer’s Milk Vetch.
the Calypso’s (Calypso bulbosa)are still blooming
plus Corallorhiza maculata in the woods.
Then there are Nemophila menziesii in the E. meadow.”




April 7, 2003

Mary Stevens reports:
Coastal Trail, Marin Headlands near intersection of Conzelman Rd and McCullough Rd.
Amsinckia menziesii var. intermedia Fiddleneck
Aquilegia formosa Red Columbine
Arabis blepharophylla Coast Rock-cress
Calystegia purpurata ssp. purpurata Coastal Morning-glory
Cardamine californica Woodland Milk-maids
Castilleja subinclusa ssp. franciscana Franciscan Paintbrush
Cerastium arvense Field Chickweed
Claytonia perfoliata Miners Lettuce
Dichelostemma capitatum Bluedicks
Eschscholzia californica California Poppy
Fragaria vesca Wild Strawberry
Galium porrigens Climbing Bedstraw
Heracleum lanatum Cow Parsnip
Hieracium albiflorum White Hawkweed
Lathyrus vestitus var. vestitus Hillside Pea
Ligusticum apiifolium Lovage
Marah fabaceus Manroot
Marah oregonus Oregon Manroot
Mimulus aurantiacus Sticky Bush Monkeyflower
Phacelia californica California Perennial Phacelia
Ranunculus californicus California Buttercup
Rubus ursinus California Blackberry
Sanicula crassicaulis Pacific Sanicle
Scrophularia californica ssp. californica Bee-plant
Sidalcea malviflora Checker-bloom
Sisyrinchium bellum Blue-eyed Grass
Solanum sp. Nightshade
Stachys ajugoides v. rigida Hedgenettle
Toxicodendron diversilobum Poison Oak
Vaccinium ovatum Huckleberry


Trillium ovatum
photo by Mary Aline Stevens

April 3, 2003

Bob Sills reports from Muir Woods National Monument Main & Hillside Trails
Anemone oregana Windflower
Cardamine californica Woodland Milk-maids
Claytonia perfoliata Miners Lettuce
Disporum hookeri Green Fairy Bells
Disporum smithii White Fairy Bells
Iris douglasiana Douglas Iris
Marah fabaceus Manroot
Osmorhiza chilensis Sweet Cicely
Oxalis oregana Redwood Sorrel
Petasites frigidus var. palmatus Western Coltsfoot
Rubus parviflorus Thimbleberry
Smilacina stellata Slim Solomon
Tellima grandiflora Fringe-cups
Trillium chloropetalum Sessile-flowered Wakerobin
Trillium ovatum Pedunculate Wake-robin
Viola sempervirens Redwood Violet
Bob also reports “As I was noting the twelfth species, I heard a woman in a nearby group say “No flowers.” Another woman in the group answered, “No wonder! Look at how little sunlight gets through.””



April 2, 2003

Bob Soost reports: “Major roadside displays of Ranunuclus californicus along Sir Francis Drake Blvd. in San Geronimo & along Nicasio Valley Rd. between Lucas Valley Rd. & Point Reyes – Petaluma Rd. Nemophila menziesii (Baby-blue-eyes) is still blooming on the right side of the Point Reyes National Seashore Kehoe Beach trail at the far end just before the trail descends to the beach.”


March 31, 2003

Sharon Salisbury reports that the Homestead Valley Trail “..is alive with flowers. On the way up and along both sides of the left trail are literally hundreds of Calorchortus umbellatus, Ranunculus californicus,Camissonia ovata, some Eschscholzia californica, Sanicula bipinnatifida, many Iris. I believe the pale yellow ones in the woods are Iris douglasiana, but there are some shorter, brilliant purple ones in the grass that I think are ground iris (Iris macrosiphon). In the woods hundreds of Smilacina stellata …a beautiful sight…a carpet of these with yellow Douglas iris coming up amongst them…and Disporum hookeri. Further along the trail there are still some Pedicularis densiflora. Also Sisyrinchium bellum, Dichelostemma capitatum, Montia perfoliata, Marah fabaceus and probably more as I have yet to make it to the end of the trail. It is worth a trip just for the Iris (there are hundreds of the Douglas iris in the first hundred yards, Oakland Star Tulips and Slim Solomon’s Seal.”


Castilleja densiflora
photo by Doreen L. Smith

March 28, 2003

Doreen Smith reports that the “Mt. Burdell lower slopes above San Marin Drive, especially the serpentinite exposures, including the knoll just NE of the end of Simmons Lane open-space entrance, are absolutely wonderful this year. There are many, many plants of several different annual and perennial species. The Simmons Lane population of white Linanthus androsaceus is more numerous than I’ve ever seen it, also there is a lot of “mauve” Collinsia sparsiflora on the shady side of the knoll-top. Definitely worth a mini-field trip. The San Carlos Drive open-space entrance and to the west along the fire road is good for Linanthus parviflorus (white-flowered) (Triphysaria versicolor faucibarbata), white balloon clover (Trifolium depauperatum), pink owl’s-clover (Castilleja densiflora), and blue-purple larkspur (Delphinium hesperium). The bitter-root flowers are open in the afternoon, particularly down the hill,approximately on the barren near the path from the San Mateo Drive open-space entrance. This grassland bloom is a must-see for anyone with the time to spare.”




March 27, 2003

Jim Gratiot adds to his list of native wildflowers in bloom on Mt. Burdell:
Cicendia quadrangularis, Tiny Yellow Gentian
Crassula connata, Sand Pigmy-weed
Delphinium patens, Woodland Larkspur
Lathyrus vestitus, Hillside Pea
Lewisia rediviva, Bitter Root
Linanthus parviflorus, Small-flowered Linanthus
Lithophragma affine, Woodland Star
Lupinus bicolor, Miniature Lupine
Nemophila heterophylla, Small-flowered Nemophila
Phacelia distans, Fern Leaved Phacelia
Plagiobothrys nothofulvus, Popcorn Flower
Sidalcea malviflora, Checker-bloom
Sisyrinchium bellum, Blue-eyed Grass


March 25, 2003

Sharon Salisbury reports sightings on the Matt Davis extension trail from Pan Toll:
“Calypso orchids on both sides of the trail. A rough estimate would be 100+ of them in full bloom. There were also hundreds of Hounds Tongues, more than I have ever seen anywhere, including this trail, in my life. There were also a few Delphinium nudicaule, Blue-eyed Grass and a clump of what I believe to be either Coast Iris or Ground Iris. I walk that trail every year about this time and I don’t ever recall seeing so many orchids and Hounds Tongues. Quite a display.”



March 22, 2003

Sharon Salisbury reports: wildflowers in bloom on the Miwok Trail:
Arabis blepharophylla, Coast Rock-cress
Eschscholzia californica, California Poppy
Cardamine californica, Milk-maids
Platystemon californicus, Cream-cup
Camissonia ovata, Sun-cups
Sanicula bipinnatifida, Red-Purple Sanicle
Marah fabaceus, Manroot
Dodecatheon hendersonii, Shooting Star


Monolopia majorphoto by MAStevensLewisia redivivaphoto by MAStevens

 

 

 

 

 

March 20, 2003

Doreen Smith reports: “Monolopia major …is about at its peak and a short hike along the fire road between San Carlos and San Mateo entrances to Mt.Burdell Open Space is the most “floral” it’s going to be all year.”
(Doreen Smith recently discovered this population of Monolopia major on Mt. Burdell. Monolopia major was found once before in Marin, not at Mt. Burdell, but near San Rafael, according to the pressed specimen in California Academy of Sciences.)
Doreen further reports: “Additional plants flowering are Linanthus androsaceus -an all white population with purple throats, with the Monolopia, near the E. end of the Burdell open space- above the Wood Oaks subdivision, off Fieldstone. The blue Delphinium variegatum is in bloom in the area between San Carlos and San Mateo Cts on the serpentine along with the first Lewisia rediviva. The Goldfields there is now Lasthenia gracilis according to the latest taxonomy.”




March 18, 2003

Jim Gratiot reports: “I was jogging on Burdell today and can’t believe the array of flowers:”
Johnny Tuck (Triphysaria versicolor ssp. faucibarbata)
Common Owl’s Clover (Castilleja densiflora)
Bluedicks (Dichelostemma capitatum)
Tidytips (Layia chrysanthemoides)
Dwarf Plantain (Plantago erecta)
Cream-cup (Platystemon californicus)
Turkey Pea (Sanicula tuberosa)
Red-Purple Sanicle (Sanicula bipinnatifida)
Pacific Sanicle (Sanicula crassicaulis)
Long-leaflet Balloon Clover (Trifolium depauperatum)
Sun-cups(Camissonia ovata)
California Buttercup(Ranunculus californicus)



March 12, 2003

Mary Stevens reports the following in bloom on the Coastal Trail, Marin Headlands
near intersection of Conzelman Rd and McCullough Rd.
Aquilegia formosa Red Columbine
Arabis blepharophylla Coast Rock-cress
Cardamine californica Woodland Milk-maids
Castilleja subinclusa ssp. franciscana Franciscan Paintbrush
Corylus cornuta var. californica Hazelnut
Cynoglossum grande Hound’s Tongue
Eschscholzia californica California Poppy
Fragaria vesca Wild Strawberry
Fritillaria affinis Mission Bells
Galium porrigens Climbing Bedstraw
Ligusticum apiifolium Lovage
Marah fabaceus Manroot
Mimulus aurantiacus Sticky Bush Monkeyflower
Sambucus racemosa Red-berried Elder
Sidalcea malviflora Checker-bloom
Toxicodendron diversilobum Poison Oak
Vaccinium ovatum Huckleberry


March 10, 2003

Sharon Salisbury reports from Homestead Valley Trail, Mill Valley:
Calochortus umbellatus Oakland Star-tulip
Camissonia ovata Sun-cups
Iris douglasiana Douglas Iris (white in the woods and dark purple in the sun)
Cynoglossum grande Hound’s Tongue
Pedicularis densiflora Indian Warrior
Marah fabaceus Manroot
Ranunculus californicus California Buttercup
Fritillaria affinis var. affinis Mission Bells
Trillium ovatum ssp. ovatum Pedunculate Wake-robin
Cardamine californica var. californica Woodland Milk-maids
Sanicula bipinnatifida Red-Purple Sanicle
Rubus ursinus California Blackberry
Smilacina stellata Slim Solomon


March 10, 2003

Bob Sills reports:
Newly blooming at Muir Woods National Monument
Petasites frigidus var. palmatus Western Coltsfoot
New blooms at the bottom of the Steep Ravine Trail:
Acer macrophyllum Big-leaf Maple
Osmorhiza chilensis Sweet Cicely
Physocarpus capitatus Ninebark
Rubus spectabilis Salmonberry


March 6, 2003

Bob Sills reports: “The following were also blooming at the bottom of the Steep Ravine Trail:
Claytonia perfoliata Miner’s Lettuce
Smilacina stellata Slim Solomon’s Seal
Sanicula crassicaulis Gambel Weed or Pacific Sanicle
Fritillaria affinis Mission Bell
Rubus parviflorus Thimbleberry


March 2, 2003

Bob Sills reports in bloom at Muir Woods National Monument:
Trillium ovatum Pedunculate Wake-robin
Oxalis oregana Redwood Sorrel
Anemone oregana Windflower
Disporum smithii White Fairy Bells
Cardamine californica Woodland Milk-maids
Viola sempervirens Redwood Violet
Scoliopus bigelovii Fetid Adder’s Tongue (one still blooming)


Trillium chloropetalum
photo by Mary Aline Stevens

March 2, 2003

Mary Stevens reports the following in bloom on Steep Ravine Trail, Mt. Tamalpais (bottom end of trail, across Rt.1 from Steep Ravine Environmental Campground)
Trillium chloropetalum
Sessile-flowered Wakerobin
Smilacina racemosa
Fat Solomon
Sambucus racemosa
Red-berried Elder
Cardamine californica
Woodland Milk-maids
Disporum smithii
White Fairy Bells
Marah fabaceus
Manroot
Oemleria cerasiformis
Oso Berry, Indian Plum
Heracleum lanatum
Cow Parsnip




March 1, 2003

Jim Gratiot reports the following wildflowers in bloom on Rush Creek trail, along the first 1/2 mile (flat, easy walk; take road to Gnoss Field just off Atherton exit, Novato)
Cardamine californica var. californica Woodland Milk-maids
Claytonia perfoliata Miners Lettuce
Dodecatheon hendersonii Shooting Star
Galium californicum ssp.californicum Hairy Bedstraw
Nemophila heterophylla Small-flowered Nemophila
Ranunculus californicus California Buttercup
Sanicula crassicaulis Pacific Sanicle, Snakeroot
Saxifraga californica Saxifrage


February 27, 2003

Bob Sills reports from Sky Oaks: “Quite a few California saxifrage in bloom on the Concrete Pipe Fire Road west of Five Corners (along with abundant milkmaids & hounds tongues).”


Saxifraga californica
photo by Brad Kelley

February 24, 2003

Brad Kelley reports: “Saxifraga californica; California Saxifrage is blooming in the French Ranch,
Roy’s Redwoods, and Loma Alta Open Spaces. A hand lens reveals the beauty of these tiny flowers.”




February 23, 2003

Mary Stevens reports: “Calypso bulbosa is blooming at Laurel Dell, Rock Spring, and along the Matt Davis Trail west of Pantoll. Another place to look for it is on Steep Ravine trail just below Pan Toll.”


February 18, 2003

Bob Sills reports: “blooming today on Matt Davis Trail between Bootjack & Nora Trails: Fritillaria affinis mission bell, Dendromecon rigida tree poppy, Pedicularis densiflora Indian warrior, Castilleja sp. paintbrush, and assorted manzanita & ceanothus.”


February 11, 2003

Sharon Salisbury reports: “I was at the little-known Eli Jaquette Open Space in Marinwood and found lots of Dichelostemma capitatum, Lomatium dasycarpum, Sanicula crassicaulis, Ranunculus californicus and Dodecatheon hendersonii.”




Blennosperma nanum var. n2Arctostaphylos canescensphoto by Doreen L. Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 10, 2003

Doreen Smith reports: “Little Blennosperma Blennosperma nanum in bloom on south-facing slopes of Mt. Burdell and on Wilson Hill near Chileno Valley; a green form of California Pipe-vine Aristolochia californica blooming on Lucas Valley Road across from Lucas Valley Estates; Ribes californicum (California Gooseberry) and Ribes menziesii (Canyon Gooseberry) blooming under the redwoods by the side of Lucas Valley Road west of Big Rock; Arctostaphylos canescens (Hoary Manzanita) and Arctostaphylos glandulosa (Eastwood Manzanita) blooming in the chaparral on Mt. Tamalpais.


February 9, 2003

Bob Soost reports: “Patches of Blennosperma nanum var. robustum are now visible from the parking lot at the Bull Point Trailhead on Sir Francis Drake Highway in Point Reyes National Seashore. There are three smaller patches to the SW (Right) & a very large patch to the NE (Left). Other places to look for Blennosperma nanum var. robustum are near the end of Pierce Point Road & on the ocean side of Sir Francis Drake Highway near the parking lot for the Point Reyes Light House.”


February 4, 2003

Bob Soost reports: &quotNemophila menziesii (Baby-blue-eyes) is beginning to bloom on the right side of the Point Reyes National Seashore Kehoe Beach trail at the far end just before the trail descends to the beach.”


Epilobium canum 
photo by Brad Kelley

August 27, 2002

Brad Kelly reports: “The California Fuschia (Epilobium canum) are putting on a good display now. There is a nice bright patch in a dangerous location as you drive over White Hill on Sir Francis Drake Blvd. It is on the left just before the top of the hill (going west). A less dangerous location is on the Oak Manor Fire Road in the Loma Alta Open Space.&quot
Editor’s note: It can also be seen blooming about .3 to .5 mile above Pantoll at eye level along the road to Rock Spring.

 


Calochortus luteus photo by M Stevens

May 30, 2000

Mary Stevens reports:”Tiburon Mariposa Lily (Calochortus tiburonensis) is in bloom on Ring Mountain. Yellow Mariposa Lily (Calochortus luteus) is blooming in open meadows on Mt. Tamalpais. Oakland Star-tulip (Calochortus umbellatus) is also in bloom on Mt. Tamalpais. It can be found along the Rock Spring Trail near Mountain Theater. Yellow Pond Lily (Nuphar lutea ssp. polysepalum), the only waterlily native to California, is blooming on Lily Lake between Azalea Hill and Alpine Dam at milepost 6.09 on the Bolinas-Fairfax Road. Western Azalea (Rhododendron occidentale) with its “most delicious fragrance.” is now blooming on Mt. Tamalpais.”


Clintonia_andrewsiana photo by M StevensClintonia_andrewsiana photo by M Stevens

May 19, 2000

Mary Stevens reports:”Clintonia andrewsiana is blooming now on Mt. Tam. There are 11 plants in bloom at the intersection of West Ridgecrest Blvd. and the Bolinas-Fairfax Road. They are just to the right inside the gate at the start of the Bolinas Ridge Fire Road. Here you can also see Pacific Starflower (Trientalis latifolia) in bloom. The small rosettes of dark green leaves marbled with white lines in this same area belong to the Rattlesnake Orchid (Goodyera oblongifolia), which will bloom in late summer. Another great place to see Clintonia andrewsiana is along the Steep Ravine Trail down from Pantoll. In a good year, you can count over 100 plants in bloom.”


Lupinus arboreus photo by M StevensLupinus polyphyllus IMG 0913smRubus spectabilis photo by M StevensSalmon-berry berry photo by M Stevens

May 7, 2000

Mary Stevens reports: ” Blue Bush Lupine (Lupinus arboreus) is in full bloom along the trail behind the dunes at Limantour Beach. At Abbotts Lagoon the Giant Bog Lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus) is in full bloom. Look for it just beyond the first bridge, in a low swale across the trail from the small pond. Yellow Bush Lupine, the more common form of the fragrant Lupinus arboreus, is just beginning to bloom here. Just beyond the Giant Bog Lupine, the Salmon-berry (Rubus spectabilis) by the side of the trail has both blossoms and berries.”




May 7, 2000

Sharon Salisbury reports:” On the Cross Marin trail in Samuel P Taylor State Park I saw many Solomon’s Seal, Crimson Columbine, Giant trillium, Bleeding Hearts, Thimble Berry, Bee Plant, Hedge Nettle, Douglas iris and Pacific Starflower. We started at the West end of the trail, by the bridge. All the flowers were in the first mile or so, most of them on the creek side of the path.”


April 14, 2000

Sharon Salisbury reports finding one remaining Calypso bulbosa on the Matt Davis Trail west of Pantoll. She confirms the presence of two other native orchids in bloom there: Spotted Coralroot (Corallorhiza maculata) and Striped Coralroot (Corallorhiza striata).


April 3, 2000

Mary Stevens reports: “Calypso bulbosa can still be seen in bloom on Mt. Tam. On the Matt Davis Trail from Pantoll heading in the direction of Stinson Beach, start looking for them on both sides of the trail not too long after entering the woods. Once you reach them, also watch the upper side of the trail for two other native orchids just beginning to bloom: Spotted Coralroot (Corallorhiza maculata) and Stripped Coralroot (Corallorhiza striata). In between the coralroots you can also find budding Pyrola picta, a saprophytic member of the Heath family. Several years ago a plant with green leaves was growing in this location, but it is a rare sighting on Mt. Tam. The Calypso orchids continue on both sides of the trail. Farther on are Red Larkspur (Delphinium nudicaule) and cream-colored Douglas Iris (Iris douglasiana). On your left just before the trail clambers up over some rocks, in a patch of blooming Slim Solomon (Smilacina stellata), there are Mission Bells (Fritillaria affinis) starting to bloom.”


March 27, 2000

Don Henry and Ed Ricketts Jr. report noticing “five or more Calypsos along the Simmons Trail, just beyond where the Benstein branches off and just short of where Simmons meets Ziesche Creek.”



March 25, 2000

Bernie Beck reports “a fine display of calypso orchids near the Rock Springs parking area on Mount Tam. Head north from the parking area toward the Cataract and Benstein trails, take the first unsigned trail you come to along the right side of the meadow and head in the direction of the Mountain Theater. Before you reach East Ridgecrest Blvd., you will see numerous calypso orchids on the south side of the trail under the Douglas firs. There are also many milk maids and shooting stars.”



March 15, 2000

On Wilma Follette’s Wednesday Wildflower Walk, along the Matt Davis Trail from Mountain Home to Bootjack, returning on the Troop 80 Trail, we saw 29 different species in bloom including 3 species each of Ceanothus (foliosus, cuneatus, and jepsonii) and Arctostaphylos (nummularia, glandulosa, and hookeri ssp. montana). The most numerous of the bloomers was Indian Warrior (Pedicularis densiflora). The Mission Bells (Fritillaria affinis) are just beginning to bloom along the Matt Davis Trail, about 200 paces northeast of Bootjack.



Calypso bulbosa photo by Doreen L. Smith

March 12, 2000

Bob Sills reports Calypso bulbosa blooming along both sides of the Matt Davis Extension Trail (west from Pantoll) on Mount Tamalpais.


Zigadenus fremontii photo by Doreen L. Smith

February 26, 2000

Spring wildflowers are blooming on schedule. Our walk on Mt. Burdell with Doreen Smith was a success with all of the promised species in bloom except for Arctostaphylos manzanita, which has finished blooming and is already producing its “little apples”. At the peak of bloom were:
Fragrant Fritillary (Fritillaria liliacea)
Star Lily (Zigadenus fremontii)
Milk Maids (Cardamine californica)
California Buttercup (Ranunculus californicus)
Also blooming (partial list) were:
Hounds Tongue (Cynoglossum grande)
Bluedicks (Dichelostemma capitatum)
Sun-cups (Camissonia ovata)
Shooting Stars (Dodecatheon hendersonii)
Cream-cup (Platystemon californicus)
California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica)
Checker-bloom (Sidalcea malviflora)
Snakeroot Sanicle (Sanicula crassicaulis)
Hairypetal Hog Fennel (Lomatium dasycarpum)
And with one plant blooming each:
Mission bells (Fritillaria affinis var. affinis)
Striped Coralroot Orchid (Corallorhiza striata)
California Saxifrage (Saxifraga californica)
Tidytips (Lasthenia chrysanthemoides)



February 10, 2000

Sharon Salisbury reports seeing at least 100 Star Lilies (Zigadenus fremontii) along the Warner Canyon Firetrail, as well as Indian Warriors (Pedicularis densiflora), bunches of Trilliums (Trillium ovatum), and Fetid Adders Tongues (Scoliopus bigelovii), farther along the trail, near and in the Redwood Grove. She also reports Hounds Tongues (Cynoglossum grande) blooming on the firetrail behind the Mill Valley golf course.


February 3, 2000

Don Henry reports “80 plants of Scoliopus bigelovii (20 in bloom) on Throckmorton in Mill Valley at the small parking lot below Cascade Falls, and 280 plants (1/3 in bloom) by Alpine Lake along Cataract Trail below the steps to the waterfall. Look for them also in Muir Woods by the trailside beyond the second bridge. Trillium ovatum, White Trillium, Redwood Sorrel, and Oxalis oregana, are just beginning to bloom in Muir Woods.


January 16, 2000

Bob Sills reports Scoliopus bigelovii blooming in Muir Woods


Salal

September 15, 1999

Mary Stevens reports: “Salal (Gaultheria shallon) is sporting both blossoms and berries under the Bishop Pines (Pinus muricata) along the road up Mount Vision at Pt. Reyes National Seashore. California Fuchsia or Zauschneria (Epilobium canum) can be seen (by the quick eye) sporting its red tubular flowers on the steep rocky roadcut about .4 mile above Pantoll on the road to Rock Spring. Elk Clover (Aralia californica) is blooming and forming berries in the moist shady draws at an elevation of approximately 1,000 ft on both sides of the ridge along the Bolinas-Fairfax Road between Alpine Dam and Bolinas. Look for it near mileposts 8.95 to 9.47 and 12.2 to 12.72. Rattlesnake Plantain (Goodyera oblongifolia), is still blooming. You can see it under the Douglas Fir canopy along Cataract Trail beyond the bridge that crosses Cataract Creek about .4 mile from Rock Spring. Another easily accessible location is at the juction of West Ridgecrest Boulevard and the Bolinas-Fairfax Road. There are many plants here, just to your right inside the gate at the start of the Bolinas Ridge Fire Road. Also on display in this location is Bead Lily (Clintonia andrewsiana) with its beautiful cobalt blue berries.


Goodyera oblongifolia 
photo by Mary Aline Stevens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 8, 1999

Mary Stevens reports: “Rattlesnake Plantain (Goodyera oblongifolia), a native orchid, is sending up its flower spikes. You can see it under the Douglas Fir canopy along the Cataract Trail after crossing the second bridge from Rock Spring. Another easily accessible location is at the juction of Ridgecrest and Bolinas-Fairfax Road, to the right just beyond the Bolinas Fire Road gate.California Fuchsia or Zauschneria (Epilobium canum) can be seen (by the quick eye) blooming on the steep rocky roadcut about .4 mile above Pantoll on the road up to Rock Spring.


July 26, 1999

Don Henry reports from Mount Tam and the Bolinas-Fairfax Road: “California Tiger Lily (Lilium pardalinum) is still blooming along Cataract Trail about 1 mile from Rock Spring on Mount Tamalpais. Elk Clover (Aralia californica) is blooming along the moist shady banks of the Bolinas-Fairfax Road between Bolinas Ridge and Alpine Dam. Yellow Pond Lily (Nuphar lutea ssp. polysepalum), is still showing at least one bloom among its large leaves on Lily Lake between Azalea Hill and Alpine Dam, across from milepost 6.09 on the Bolinas-Fairfax Road. Serpentine Seep Columbine (Aquilegia eximia) is still in bloom at the serpentine spring between Azalea Hill and Alpine Dam at milepost 5.23 on the Bolinas-Fairfax Road.


July 16, 1999

Bob Soost reports from Point Reyes National Seashore: Bush Monkeyflower (Mimulus aurantiacus) is creating great diplays along Limantour Road.


Lilium pardalinum 
photo by Mary Aline Stevens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 29, 1999

Mary Stevens reports: ” Leopard Lily (Lilium pardalinum) is just coming into bloom along Cataract Trail about 1 mile from Rock Spring on Mt. Tamalpais. Yellow Mariposa Lily, (Calochortus luteus), can be seen on the open grassy summer-dried hills of Mt. Tamalpais. A few blooms of Yellow Pond Lily (Nuphar lutea ssp. polysepalum), the only waterlily native to California, can be seen among the large leaves on Lily Lake between Azalea Hill and Alpine Dam at milepost 6.09 on the Bolinas-Fairfax Road. Serpentine Seep Columbine (Aquilegia eximia), a rare summer-blooming member of the buttercup family, is blooming at the serpentine spring between Azalea Hill and Alpine Dam at milepost 5.23 on the Bolinas-Fairfax Road. On both sides of the road here you can also find Western Azalea (Rhododendron occidentale) blooming with its “most delicious fragrance.” “


June 23, 1999

Mary Stevens reports: ” Calochortus tiburonensis (Tiburon Mariposa Lily), is still in bloom on Ring Mountain. California Buckeye (Aesculus californica) and Blue Elderberry (Sambucus mexicana), both of which are native Marin County trees, are now in bloom around the county. Red Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa), a native tree which prefers a moist habitat, has already produced its clusters of bright red berries. California Pipevine (Aristolochia californica), has attracted the Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly which lays its eggs on the plant. Look for the orange-spined black caterpillars munching on the leaves.”


Lupinus polyphyllus IMG 0913sm

May 20, 1999

Mary Stevens reports the following in flower:
Abbott’s Lagoon, Pt.Reyes:
Lupinus arboreus (Yellow Bush Lupine)
Lupinus polyphyllus (Bog Lupine)
Eschscholzia californica (California Poppy)
Rubus spectabilis (Salmon-berry)
Castilleja exserta ssp. latifolia (Purple Owl’s-clover)
Ranunculus orthorhyncus (Straightbeak Buttercup)
Double Bowknot, Mt. Tamalpais:
Xerophyllum tenax (Bear Grass), it is very unusual to see this member of the lily family blooming in Marin County
Horkelia tenuiloba (Thin-lobed Horkelia)